Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) is a Washington, D.C., law firm providing biobased and renewable chemical product stakeholders unparalleled experience, judgment, and excellence in bringing innovative products to market.

On July 27, 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator signed the final rule Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products, setting formaldehyde emission standards for hardwood plywood, medium-density fiberboard, and particleboard, as well as for finished products containing these products. This final rule discusses alternatives to regulated composite wood products, specifically mentioning Ecovative Design, LLC's packaging, building materials, and automotive products that are grown from agricultural byproducts and mycelium. The mycelium binds the wood together, completely eliminating the need for resins containing formaldehyde. The products created through this biofabrication process are not considered to be hardwood plywood, particleboard, or medium-density fiberboard (MDF) and, thus, are not subject to these new regulations. Ecovative Design, LLC was the recipient of a 2014 EPA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award to help develop new alternatives to regulated composite wood products. EPA states that it encourages other companies to explore all aspects of their production process to lower formaldehyde emissions from their products.


 

On May 6, 2014, INVISTA, a large U.S. headquartered integrated producer of chemical intermediaries, polymers, and fibers, and owner of the LYCRA Brand, announced the introduction of the "only commercial offering of a bio-derived spandex available globally and for use in a wide variety of apparel fabrics and garments." The company explains that "[a]pproximately 70 percent by weight of the new LYCRA® bio-derived spandex fiber comes from a renewable source made from dextrose derived from corn." A copy of the Company's press release is available online.


 

Kia Motors Corporation announced this week that "the company's new Soul EV (electric vehicle), which will have its world premiere at the 2014 Chicago Auto Show starting later this week, has achieved UL Environment validation for bio-based organic carbon content for 10% of its interior materials. UL Environment is the environmental business unit of UL (Underwriters Laboratories), a global independent safety science company." The Company explained that "[v]arious bio-based materials have been applied to the Soul EV, such as bio degradable plastic, bio-foam and bio-fabric. Unlike previous plastic materials that are based from oils, bio-based materials are derived from biomass, which is a photosynthate. Such modern biochemical technologies have replaced the majority of the existing chemistry industry by offering an alternative through development of new bio-materials." A copy of the Company's press release is available online.